Open Wide and say aaaaaaagh was fun to write. It draws on my experiences in the Federal Government and the looniness it describes is pretty much the way it is. But lest you wonder -- it is not a roman a clef. I hope the characters resemble real people, but they aren't anyone that I know. Honest.

If you think you would like to read it but you're not too sure, the first few pages of Me Tarzan You Dead may help you make up your mind.

However, in the spirit of OMG, it turned out that the word "Tarzan" is not just copywrited but TradeMarked. So, if you want to read the whole thing you can find it on Amazon not as "Me Tarzan You Dead but as Open Wide and say AAAAAAAAAAAAAARGH.

The Case of the Eclipsed Astronomer
was even more more fun because I wrote it with a for-real astronomer, Dr. Sethanne Howard. This book continues my exploration and exposition of the looniness of the Feds.

Here are the first few pages of The Eclipsed Astronomer.

A Fine Climate for Murder was a challenge because it tackled a topic -- global warming -- that I didn't know much about. In addition, the books are all set in 1992 and global warming didn't really enter the public consciousness for about 20 years after that. Thank heavens for expert reviewers such as Kevin Munroe from Huntley Meadows Park and Chris Farley from the Department of Agriculture. Why, you might ask, did I choose this topic? I asked myself the same question all the way through the writing and research.

Here is the Prologue of A Fine Climate for Murder

Blood will Snitch was not only fun, but Dr. Mike Coble (the leader of the team that identified the bodies in the grave as the for-real Romanoffs) walked me through the workings of DNA -- something I always wondered about. The acronym, by the way, stands for DeoxyriboNucleic Acid. Now aren't you glad you know that?

Here is the Prologue of Blood will Snitch

Bug 'em to Death
explores the deadly world of microbiology, with Dr. Mina Izadjoo as our guide.

Here are a few pages from Bug 'em to Death

Forecast: Sunny with Occational Murders
documents the demise of three economists. It took two living economists to explain (sort of) what economics is all about.

Here is the Introduction to Forecast: Sunny with Occational Murders